Buddha was not an atheist. He was the 8th Avatar of Vishnu


Gautama Buddha was a Hindu reformer in a time of corrupt priests. Like Jesus, he had no intention of creating a new religion. He was bringing new understandings to the teachings of the Vedas and Upanishads. Sadguru Sant Keshavadas and Sadguru Rama Mata taught us that Gautama Buddha was the 9th Avatar of Vishnu.

The Asian area between India and China had been Hindu for several millennia. Naturally, they added the Buddhist teachings to its predecessors. This should not be hard to understand for Westerners, because Christians continue to believe in and teach the Torah, the Old Testament.

The idea that Gautama Buddha was an atheist is nonsense. He taught a version of Hinduism that freed people from the corrupt priests. His major change from the teachings of the 8th Avatar, Krishna, was that he taught spiritual independence. Krishna taught people to depend on him, to merge their consciousness in him. Gautama Buddha taught that our sufferings are our own creations and that we can end our sufferings by ending our cravings — those attitudes and behaviors that create karma.



About Satyabhama Ashley-Farrand

Satyabhama met Satguru Sant Keshavadas in December 1980 at his Temple of Cosmic Religion in Washington, DC. She also met Thomas Ashley-Farrand/Namadeva Acharya (1940-2010) the same evening, and a year and a week later they were married by Satgurus Sant Keshavadas and Rama Mata. Satyabhama studied with Sant Keshavadas and Rama Mata and with Namadeva for the next 3 decades. She became a Vedic priest in her own right in the mid-1980s and worked with Namadeva Acharya in performing and teaching ancient mantra techniques and spiritual practices. In 2008 and 2009, like Namadeva Acharya, she received guru diksha to be a guru from Satguru Rama Mata, Sadguru Sant Keshavadas' widow, to whom he passed the lineage in 1997. When Namadeva Acharya discovered that his death was imminent, he told Satyabhama that he wanted her to continue their mission of teaching the dharma, and he gave her a powerful initiation to enable her to teach his workshops with his spiritual energy. Since then, she has continued to travel and teach and also to manage the Gayatri Temple in Beaverton, Oregon, with the encouragement of Satguru Rama Mata and her family. Satyabhama has a B.A. from New York University and a Law Degree from Southwestern School of Law. Dedicated to serving God through humanity, she is a certified mediator and maintained a private law practice from 1981-2007. Prior to her law practice, Satyabhama worked to further the status of women through her involvement with the National Organization for Women and the National Women's Political Caucus. In 2004, Satyabhama assumed management of Saraswati Publications, LLC and Sanatana Dharma Satsang, Inc., a 501(c)3 religious organization. She is committed to making the world a better place in which Divine Law becomes the law of life.

One response

  1. Having attended Namadeva’s workshops for years, I enjoyed the stories and learning chants for the particular hero/heroine of the tales. Hindu philosophy is deep, containing gods and goddesses going back even before our current era.

    When I met Namadeva and Satyabhama, I was studying with a Lakota teacher. The two traditions dovetail in many respects. A book on Hinduism from Bolingen Press says clearly that the two mythologies are quite similar.

    Often, the only vacation I enjoyed in the summer was a trip to a workshop in the Sierra Nevadas at Far Horizons. It renewed me and gave me a spiritual experience to face the new school year. I still practice the mantras and have found them efficacious in clearing as well as bringing in new behaviors and directions.

    Do yourself a favor and try one of Satyabhama’s workshops. I expect you’ll be hooked and want to learn more.